S E A T T L E C H R O N I C L E
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Seattle History
Written by: William B. Beyers
Native Americans including the Snohomish and the Suquamish lived in the area before Seattle was founded. In 1852 a white settlement, established the previous year at Alki Point, was moved to the present-day site of downtown Seaftle; the city was named for Suquamish leader Chief Seattle. A sawmill was constructed at Seattle in 1853, and exploitation of the rich local timber resources began. Seattle was incorporated as a city in 1869. The settlement grew slowly at first, but after the arrival in nearby Tacoma of a transcontinental railroad in 1883, the city experienced a population boom. Chinese workers began to arrive in the 1860s, and by the mid-1 880s their population exceeded 500. Fears that cheap immigrant labor would cost whites their jobs resulted in anti-Chinese riots, and many Chinese were driven from town. A fire leveled the old downtown on June 6, 1889, but the area was
Original photo by Brian Huntoon
reconstructed, and Pioneer Square still contains many buildings from this period. Seattle served as a gateway to, and a supply center for, the Yukon and Alaska gold rushes of the 1890s, and its population swelled from 37,000 in 1889 to 237,000 in 1 91 0. Four transcontinental railroads served the city by 1910, and trade was further stimulated by the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914 and the Lake Washington Ship Canal a few years later. By this time Seattle had a diverse population. A large Scandinavian community was centered in the fisheries-oriented Ballard area, and many people of Japanese and Chinese descent worked in the agricultural lands of the Duwamish and Green river valleys.

World War I (1 91 4-1918) stimulated the growth of port activities in Seattle. In February 1919, Seattle shipworker's striking for increased wages were joined by the city's other trade unions, creating a three-day general strike. Since World War 11 (1 939-1945) the region's economy has been dominated by the aerospace industry. Boeing Airplane Company has operated in the area since before World War 11; the company developed the 707 commercial jet-powered plane that permanently changed civilian air travel. After a peak in population in the 1950s at about 575,000, Seattle's population declined as people moved to the suburbs. From 1980 to 1990 people were again attracted to Seattle and the population increased. According to the 1990 census, people of Asian background represent 11.8 percent of the population, blacks 10.1 percent, people of Hispanic background 3.6 percent, and Native Americans 1.4 percent. Population (1 980) 493,846; (1 990) 516,259.

Map of Seattle
Original photo by Tom Wittgow
Points of (Mundane) Interest
Seattle Center & Space Needle
  • Opera House (Seattle Opera Association & Seattle Symphony Orchestra)
  • Bagley Wright(Seattle Repertory Theatre Company)
  • Seattle Center Playhouse (Intiman Theatre Company)
  • Pacific Science Center
  • Space Needle
    ACT
  • A Contemporart Theatre
    Museum of History and Industry + Art Museum
  • Museum of History and Industry
  • Henry Art Museum
  • Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum
    Kingdome Stadium
  • Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park
  • Pike Place Market
  • Pioneer Square
  • Kingdome (Mariners, Seahawks, Supersonics>
  • Seattle Art Museum

    Points of (Kithain) Interest
  • Mona's Aquarium - Not only is this a freehold, but it is also a lot of fun to be around. Not to be confused with the Seattle Aquarium. It was inherited by Mona by her adopted mother, a Sidhe Noble. Mona has hence fixed it up and is running it as an aquarium focused more towards young children than any other age group, but it is nonetheless fun for the whole family.
  • Charlie's Deli - Owned and operated by a friendly old Boggan. Charlie's is a great place for lunch and is a frequent hangout for grumps, where they can enjoy more mature discussions than may be encountered in some more routy parts of the ciry.
  • Nightshade's - This is a nightclub which is located in a darker portion of the city. It is very common to find a troupe of Unseelie kithain there, for one reason or another, and of course no satyr is unfaminiar with the venue.
  • Woodland Park - This park is located in northern Seattle, and has the beautiful Green Lake in the middle. There are a couple wood-nymphs who are rumored to reside in the park.

    Original photo by Tom Wittgow
    Story Ideas

  • The Riddler - Sir Gwenyl, an Unseelie sidhe, decides to play a game with the group, giving them enigmatic notes that end up putting the troupe on a "wild goose chase" with the hopes of retrieving something they lost at the end. After chasing him around the city and meeting some of his goons, the story climaxes with the final showdown.
  • Those Little Rats! - For some reason, small, furry chimera kind of like cartoony cats (or hyenas, maybe...) who mirror the players' personalities start running amok in the city. These wiggly, elisive critters keep escaping the players' grasps and it will take an ingenious trap to catch them for good, and then how to tame them...
  • Save the Lost Soul - Somehow, the characters encounter a young changeling that is overwhelmed by the coming Winter, and has voluntarily secluded herself in the hopes (or lack therof) that they will be ignored. They are quickly being consumed with Banality, and it will be a true test for the players to try to nurse her back to health. Will they be willing to risk their lives in the hopes of saving a fellow fae?

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